YVETTE COPPERSMITH
LOVE AND LIGHT
27 AUG – 21 SEPT 2014

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
After = Decipher 2014
oil on linen
91.5 × 66 cm

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Coupled With A Re=translation Of Materials 2014
oil on linen
91.5 × 68 cm

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Formerly Unnoticed Gestures Re=Appearing 2014
oil on linen
91.5 × 68 cm 

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Side-Effect Of Lovingly Repeated Actions 2014
oil on linen
91.5 × 66 cm

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Common Structure, Smoothie 2014
oil on linen
75.6 × 60.5 cm

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
End View From Right Hand Side 2014
oil on linen
75.6 × 60.5 cm 

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Going Backwards To Hit A Wall Of Zig-Zag Static 2014
oil on linen
76.5 × 56 cm

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Modular Personae 2014
oil on linen
91.5 × 66 cm

YVETTE COPPERSMITH
Single Span = Misshapen Pearl 2014
oil on linen
61 × 51 cm


Gallery 9 is pleased to present Love and Light, by Yvette Coppersmith.  This latest body of work shown recently in the artist’s hometown Melbourne, is being shown for the first time in Sydney.

The basis for the paintings began with the artist being in dialogue with various former lovers, asking each to create a clay model of a reclining nude from memory of Coppersmith’s body. Through this exercise, the artist received several figurines, each one an attempt to create an object from memory and inherently touching on desire and loss formed by a male gaze.

The figurines became the models in Coppersmith’s studio where they joined other domestic paraphernalia as the subjects of still life paintings and simultaneously as a body of work that functions a self portrait. The paintings present artifacts of a reclaimed trove of transient relationships, giving visual form to intangible memory. While the sculptors had memory of the artist as their muse, in the subsequent artistic interpretation, the artist has reframed the memories for herself becoming her own muse.

Invoking ideas from Julia Kristeva’s Black Sun (1989), Coppersmith describes a process whereby “the melancholy from loss of love can be transformed creatively by giving visibility where there is a void; that art can be an object replacing the love that was lost.  In this way of thinking, the paintings are transference of love from the transient exchange to the artwork itself.”