SIMON KENNEDY
ALTERED SILVER
15 NOV – 9 DEC 2017

SIMON KENNEDY
Dr Cornell 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
54.5 × 49.5 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Ghost 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
48 × 41 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Mr Squires 2017 
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.5 cm
70 × 57 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Silver Mountain 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
56.5 × 44.5 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
The Noo 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
58 × 46 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Mrs 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
58 × 47.5 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
St Bathans 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
58 × 46 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
From a Dream 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
61.5 × 50 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Mr Cunningham 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
50.5 × 46 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Mr 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
56 × 46 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Portrait of Mr Anderson 2017
silver gelatin print
24 × 30.5 cm
68.5 × 58 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Frau Ribbats 2017
silver gelatin print
20.3 × 25.4 cm
63 × 51.5 cm (framed)

SIMON KENNEDY
Think 2017
silver gelatin print
24 × 30.5 cm
71.5 × 55 cm (framed)


A driving concern throughout Simon Kennedy’s art practice has been to capture a particular quality of light: a light that gleams best in dark places.This light is silvery, almost ultraviolet like the light in the South Island of New Zealand. It is eerie, iridescent and slightly gothic. It is the light that shapes the world of the Dutch Masters, and which helps sculpt the faces of a Man Ray. For the last twenty years Kennedy has pursued this strange quality through painting and drawing. In this current exhibition, he has moved to capture this light in a new medium, using the alchemical processes of analog photography.

Kennedy manipulates each image in the dark room, borrowing techniques from early 20th century photographer and pictorialist, William Mortinsen. Like Mortensen, Kennedy bleaches, dyes, rubs charcoal and draws directly onto the prints. Kennedy also borrows from others in this tradition of experimental photography, particularly with his use of solarisation, where the image is overexposed to cast a surreal light of extreme brightness and shadow.

Ansel Adams accused Mortinsen of being kitsch and of using modernism’s new technologies to cheap effect. For Kennedy, however, this kitsch-ness is a part of the attraction to these techniques and early experimental works. There’s an unsettling, B-grade film quality to this aesthetic, like an early horror movie. Faces have an expressive, dramatic intensity, and appear to exist in a ghostly realm more real than our own.

Simon Kennedy is a BFA graduate from the Otago Polytechnic School of Art in Dunedin. Before relocating to Sydney, he staged several solo exhibitions with Marshall Seifert Gallery in Dunedin and won the Waiheke Art Prize in 2005. His work has featured in numerous group exhibitions in Sydney, Melbourne and New Zealand and has been collected by the New Zealand Parliament Collection, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and Artbank.