JAKE WALKER
PAINTINGS
7 SEPT – 1 OCT 2011

JAKE WALKER
1974 , 1974  2011
Oil on found painting
50 × 60 cm

JAKE WALKER
A E Woolf 2011
Oil on found painting
45 × 61 cm

JAKE WALKER
The Inland Sea 2011
Oil on linen mounted on board
28.5 × 36 cm

JAKE WALKER
Hawthorne Wednesday Night 2011
Oil on board
29.5 × 37 cm

JAKE WALKER
Titahi Bay 2011
Oil on board
30.5 × 40.5 cm


Gallery 9 is proud to present an exhibition by New Zealand born, Melbourne based artist Jake Walker. Winner of the inaugural Howard Arkley prize last year, Walker’s work was also highly commended in
the 2010 RBS Emerging Artists Prize. Known for his small, highly detailed paintings depicting real and imagined landscapes, this show represents a further development in Walker’s practice. Using a muted colour palette and “adjustments” made to pre-existing paintings, the work alludes to a time slippage where futuristic elements rub up against post war British colours.

Walker is inspired by the architecture of his childhood namely the houses of New Zealand architect Ian Athfield and his father Roger Walker. The way Ian Athfield used discarded or salvaged building materials (such as staircases and fireplace surrounds) placing them within a new context is a strong influence in Walker’s art practice. He explains: “Their ability to use geometry to create personality in their houses, almost to the point of anthropomorphism disturbed, intrigued and amazed me as a child and continues to do so.... I have been implanting depictions of their work into abstracted landscapes of my own making as well as inserting my abstract paintings into the landscapes of others.”

The show will also incorporate video, inspired in part by found paintings, the vision of painting on TV and a visit to the studio of Walker’s friend, the artist Rob McHaffie whose laptop was covered in bits of paint. Walker explains: “I got a real kick out of the irreverent attitude he had towards his computer and to the aesthetics of the object.” Shot at Dights Falls, where the Merri Creek and Yarra River meet, the video depicts a spiritual “hot spot”. Walker explains: “my main concern was to balance carefree paint application with a degree of interaction of moving image and painted surface. The arch over the river could symbolise passing from one state into another. I think the object also feels like it might have been retro-fitted to serve another purpose, perhaps by time travellers who have no use for the Internet but more pressing concerns of worship and transcendence”.

For more details, images or to request an interview, please contact Jane Somerville via 02 9380 9909 or jane@gallery9.com.au